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Nigeria’s School Feeding is Coming Home

In 2004, with the backing of the African Union and World Food Programme, Nigeria was part of the first wave of countries to implement a new and innovative Home Grown School Feeding and Health Programme pilot.

Employing the legislation of the Universal Basic Education Act the Federal Government rolled out a pilot scheme in 13 of the country states to implement school feeding programmes which supported agricultural development by procuring and using locally grown food. Jump forward 10 years and only two states, Osun and Kano, are still feeding their school children.

Read more: Nigeria’s School Feeding is Coming Home

 

Fortifying foods: four lessons for micronutrient distribution

Cooks in Ghana prepare school meals for childrenGetting essential vitamins and minerals on the menu for all children is key to reducing undernutrition. Four lessons can help roll out the distribution of micronutrients all over the world. 

The benefits of Micronutrient Powders 

Children in developed countries benefit from vitamins and minerals added to foods like cereals that boost healthy brain development and physical growth, helping to support the social and economic potential of the next generation. Unfortunately, not all children around the world share this advantage. Deficiencies of vitamins and minerals (also called micronutrients) are part of the larger problem of undernutrition which is an underlying cause of up to one-third of child deaths in regions such as sub-Saharan Africa and southern Asia, according to figures from Unicef.

Read more: Fortifying foods: four lessons for micronutrient distribution

   

Why we should all care about International School Meals Day

Girl in classroom in Ghana

Earlier this week hgsf-global.org attended a presentation by the World Bank's Prof Donald Bundy to the UK's All Party Parliamentary Group on School Meals on international school meals, in his World Bank blog Prof Bundy outlines why school feeding is seen as a global safety net.

Next time it could be you: Why we should all care about International School Meals Day

"Two days before the world observes International School Meals Day, I’m here sitting in the U.K. Houses of Parliament thinking about the unexpected evolution of school meals programs in recent years.

Why am I blogging about this topic from a rich country?  To understand this, we need to go back to 2008 when the global financial crisis kicked off with major spikes in food prices, and the specter of hunger loomed over the low-income world. 

Read more: Why we should all care about International School Meals Day

   

Can agriculture play a bigger role in solving malnutrition?

Farmer in Ghana

Marc Van Ameringen is Executive Director of the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN). He was recently awarded WFP's "Hunger Hero Award". In the article below, originally featured in The Guardian, he explains why an agriculture and nutrition integrated agenda is vital for addressing malnutrition in low and middle income countries. 

One of the most important events for the nutrition sector over the past two decades was the Nutrition for Growth meeting convened by David Cameron in the lead up to the last G8 meeting. For the first time we saw developing country governments, civil society, donors, and the private sector make major commitments to address undernutrition, totaling over US$ 23 billion up to 2020. But is this enough to meet Ban Ki-moon's challenge of ending hunger and malnutrition in our lifetime? Can the agriculture and nutrition communities step up to the plate and work better together?...

Read more: Can agriculture play a bigger role in solving malnutrition?

   

The State of School Feeding in Europe

map of europe resized

Based on ‘The State of School Feeding Worldwide 2013’ (WFP) the following countries in Europe have government-led school feeding: 

Read more: The State of School Feeding in Europe

   

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